677

Catechism § 677: “The Church will enter the glory of the kingdom only through this final Passover, when she will follow her Lord in his death and Resurrection. The kingdom will be fulfilled, then, not by a historic triumph of the Church through a progressive ascendancy, but only by God’s victory over the final unleashing of evil, which will cause his Bride to come down from heaven. God’s triumph over the revolt of evil will take the form of the Last Judgement after the final cosmic upheaval of this passing world.”

The Holy Catholic Church is following Rabbi Yeshua in his death and Resurrection. Some 20 years ago I asked a close personal friend of St. John Paul II whether we were living in the “age of 677” today. His exact reply was, “Yes, but when you teach this, emphasize the hope.”

Holy Mother Church herself subtly emphasizes this hope. Catechism § 677 itself lowercases “death” but capitalizes “Resurrection.” Its footnote for “Resurrection” is Rev 19:19.

Will God or man be the organizing principle of our lives and the source of all that we need? 

The family unity of the shlikhim is to reflect the family oneness of the Holy Trinity. “I and the Father are one” Jn 10:30. And he prayed in his high priestly prayer, “Holy Father, keep them in your name, which you have given me, that they may be one, even as we are one” Jn 17:11.

In recent years some churchmen have been caught up in the ancient serpent’s heresy. “You will be like God, knowing good and evil” Gen 3:5. They want to change the Church’s teaching to conform with changes in the world. They want the bishops of each country to decide their own teachings, even their own doctrines. For instance, some countries’ local churchmen say a divorced-and-remarried Catholic commits adultery while local churchmen in other countries say he doesn’t.  The Catholic Church is not an amusement park with different rides in each area. Rabbi Yeshua told us clearly,

“I say to you: whoever divorces his wife, except for unchastity, and marries another, commits adultery; and he who marries a divorced woman, commits adultery” Mt 19:9.

The situation has become so serious that Cardinal Robert Sarah warns, “Today there is a grave risk of the fragmentation of the Church, of breaking up the Mystical Body of Christ by insisting on the national identities of the Churches and thus on their capacity to decide for themselves, above all in the so-crucial domain of doctrine and morals.”

There is an old African saying, “When elephants fight the grass gets trampled.” We’re the grass. The Catechism of the Catholic Church was written for this moment in salvation history. Her teachings have their origins in Rabbi Yeshua himself, sailing across the centuries in the Barque of Peter.

Rabbi Yeshua, trying to make us saints in the New and Eternal Covenant, built his Church on Rabbi Kefa Mt 16:18, and planned since time immemorial for Peter in Rome. Her centuries-old motto is Roma locuta, causa finita est.

Rabbi Yeshua built death and rebirth deeply into his universe.

The hour has come for the Son of man to be glorified. Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. He who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. If any one serves me, he must follow me; and where I am, there shall my servant be also; if any one serves me, the Father will honor him Jn 12:23–26.

The Barque of Peter has sailed through greater storms even than this. We are in 677 “And a great storm of wind arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him and said to him, ‘Teacher, do you not care if we perish?’ And he awoke and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, ‘Peace! Be still!’ And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, ‘Why are you afraid? Have you no faith?’ And they were filled with awe, and said to one another, ‘Who then is this, that even wind and sea obey him?'” Mk 4:37–41.